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Signed cdv of Lt. Howard Bass Cushing (Alonzo & William's brother) the most prolific Apache Indian killer ever!

"Cushing, an officer of wonderful experience in Indian warfare, who with his troop, ...had killed more savages of the Apache tribe than any other officer or troop of the United States Army has done before or since..."
"Cushing may have been the most famous Indian fighter in the Arizona Territory. He was killed in the "Cochise War," ambushed by Apaches.

Signed cdv of Lt. Howard Bass Cushing (Alonzo & William's brother) the most prolific Apache Indian killer ever!
Please read the many details provided below on Howard, one of the famous Wisconsin Cushing Brothers! Ink signed with name and rank on the verso, Howard also notes that he was hung over "a very poor Photo. I had been out the night before" when the image was taken. Wear as shown, do the research on Howard and you will read about a real American hero!

P.O.R.

"Born in Milwaukee in 1838, Cushing and his three brothers spent part of their childhood in Delafield, where a large monument stands today in their honor in Cushing Park. All four Cushing brothers fought in the Civil War. President Barack Obama awarded Howard's younger brother Alonzo the Medal of Honor last year.

Alonzo was an artillery officer killed at Gettysburg as his battery helped stave off Pickett's Charge. After Alonzo's death, Howard petitioned the secretary of war to serve in his fallen brother's unit a request President Abraham Lincoln personally approved. When Howard Cushing joined Battery A, 4th Artillery, one of his brother's men gave him the bloody shoulder straps Alonzo was wearing when he was killed.

Meanwhile, another brother, William Cushing, was a Union naval officer who gained fame by sinking the Confederate ironclad CSS Albemarle in a daring raid."

"This was to be prosecuted by Lieutenant Howard B. Cushing, an officer of wonderful experience in Indian warfare, who with his troop, ( ' F " of the Third Cavalry), had killed more savages of the Apache tribe than any other officer or troop of the United States Army has done before or since. During the latter days of the preceding fall, 1869, he had struck a crushing blow at the courage of the Apaches infesting the country close to the Guadalupe Eange in southwestern Texas, and had killed and wounded many of the adults, and captured a number of children and a herd of ponies..."

""Lieutenant Cushing was one of the best and bravest officers in Arizona, and his continued campaigns against the hostiles had had a telling effect. He was considered the most successful Indian fighter in the army; brave, energetic and tireless, he followed the foe to their strongholds and there attacked them with vigor and spirit, dealing them blows the savages could not withstand. In him Arizona lost one of her most worthy defenders; a man who, at this critical time, she could ill afford to part with. He was the Custer of Arizona, and it can be said of him: 'It is a part of life and the mystery of fate, that to all men who must have their will, there comes a time when there is neither turning back nor to the side. It must be on, and on, and on, to an end that is either immortal or better to be forgotten. And it is from such ends that the children get either the story of shame, or the luster of a name shining out on the dark night of the past as a star of the greatest magnitude.'" --HISTORY OF ARIZONA. Volume VIII"

"Howard Bass Cushing's short life was a kaleidoscope of experiences and adventures. His military career began with the First Illinois Light Artillery as a private during the Civil War, and he later rose to the rank of Lieutenant in the Regular Army. He died in 1871 in an Apache ambush while leading a special scout to locate and punish marauding Apaches in southeastern Arizona Territory. A checkered military career reflected his personality. During the Civil War, he rose rapidly and proved capable of commanding an artillery battery, yet Cushing faced a court martial as the result of a drunken escapade. To escape the stigma attached to this incident, he requested, and was finally granted, a transfer to the third Cavalry in the New Mexico and Arizona Territories.

As troop commander, Cushing led numerous expeditions against renegade Apaches in both Territories. He was respected by his men and his bravery and leadership qualities were never questioned by those he led. Howard Bass Cushing is one of the unsung heroes of Arizona Territory."

"Cushing may have been the most famous Indian fighter in the Arizona Territory. He was killed in the "Cochise War," ambushed by Apaches.

""On the 5th of May, 1871, Lieutenant Howard B. Cushing, Third Cavalry, with several civilians and three soldiers, was killed by the Chiricahua Apaches, under their famous chief, Cochise, at the Bear Springs, in the Whetstone Mountains, about thirty-five miles from Tucson and about the same distance to the east of old Camp Crittenden. Cushing's whole force numbered twenty-two men, the larger part of whom was led into an ambuscade in the canyon containing the spring. The fight was a desperate one, and fought with courage and great skill on both sides. Our forces were surrounded before a shot had been fired; and it was while Cushing was endeavoring to lead his men back that he received the wounds which killed him. Had it not been for the courage and good judgment displayed by Sergeant John Mott, who had seen a good deal of service against the Apaches, not one of the command would have escaped alive out of the canyon. Mott was in command of the rear-guard, and, in coming up to the assistance of Lieutenant Cushing, detected the Apaches moving behind a low range of hills to gain Cushing's rear. He sent word ahead, and that induced Lieutenant Cushing to fall back. After Cushing dropped, the Apaches made a determined charge and came upon our men hand to hand. The little detachment could save only those horses and mules which were ridden at the moment the enemy made the attack, because the men who had dismounted to fight on foot were unable to remount, such was the impetuosity of the rush made by the Chiricahuas. There were enough animals to ride and tie,' and Mott, by keeping up on the backbone of the hills running along the Babacomori Valley, was enabled to reach Camp Crittenden without being surrounded or ambuscaded. 'Inside of forty-eight hours there were three troops of cavalry en route to Crittenden, and in pursuit of the Apaches, but no good could be effected. Major William J. Ross, at that time in command of Camp Crittenden, was most energetic in getting word to the various military commands in the southern part of the country, as well as in extending every aid and kindness to the wounded brought in by Mott. When the combined force had arrived at Bear Springs, there was to be seen every evidence of a most bloody struggle. The bodies of Lieutenant Cushing and comrades lay where they had fallen, stripped of clothing, which the Apaches always carried off from their victims. In all parts of the narrow little canyon were the carcasses of ponies and horses half-eaten by the coyotes and buzzards; broken saddles, saddlebags, canteens with bullet holes in them, pieces of harness and shreds of clothing scattered about, charred to a crisp in the flames which the savages had ignited in the grass to conceal their line of retreat. Of how many Apaches had been killed, there was not the remotest suggestion to be obtained. That there had been a heavy loss among the Indians could be suspected from the signs of bodies having been dragged to certain points, and there, apparently, put on pony back.'" --HISTORY OF ARIZONA. Volume VIII"