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GETTYSBURG* Thomas Chamberlain (20th Maine) Signed Document
Thomas Chamberlain (20th Maine) signed document. Eagle discharge signed boldly as Assistant Commissary of Musters for the 5th Army Corps.
Corporal Ray D. Morgan of the 189th New York Infantry is being discharged in May, 1865. Wear as shown in photograph, the document is evenly toned and in fine condition. This one is a real bargain!

$475.00 plus shipping

from the BANGOR WHIG AND COURIER, Thursday, August 13, 1896

Lieut.-Col. T.D. Chamberlain. Lieut.-Col. Thomas D. Chamberlain, of the law firm of Chamberlain & Chapman, on Hammond street, died at his residence at the corner of York and Adams streets Wednesday morning, the cause being a complication of typhoid fever, fever and ague and heart failure. Col. Chamberlain was a well known citizen of Bangor and his death is a source of sorrow to many friends. He was born in Brewer and his age was 55 years.

He was a veteran of the war and his record is a most excellent one. He enlisted as a private in the 20th Maine Volunteers at the organization of the regiment. He was subsequently promoted to sergeant, and upon recommendation of his company and regimental commanders was still further promoted in January, 1862 [sic], to first lieutenant of Co. G. He was soon afterwards detailed as acting adjutant of the regiment.

For efficiency and gallantry at the battle of Gettysburg he was promoted to the captaincy of Co. G. In this capacity he served all through the campaign of 1864, was wounded at Bethesda church, Virginia, and brevetted major for gallant and distinguished service at the battle of Peebles Farm, Virginia.

In December, 1864, he was appointed provost-marshal of first division, 5th corps, and served until May, 1865, when he was appointed commissary of musters of the same command.

In June, 1865, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 20th regiment and was subsequently recommended for brevet colonelcy for gallant services at the battle of Five Forks. He was mustered out of service with his regiment at the disbanding of the provisional corps after a gallant record.

At the close of the war Mr. Chamberlain was inspector of tobacco in New York, for a number of years. He then came to this city and was a deputy marshal under United States Marshal B.B. Murray. For 12 years he was connected with the pension office in Washington. He came to Bangor again in 1889. The deceased was a brother of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain, ex-governor of Maine. He leaves a widow to mourn his loss. She will have much sympathy in her bereavement.

The funeral services will be held Friday at 3 p.m. from his late residence. The remains will be taken to Castine for interment on Saturday.